Simsbury Reading Intervention Program (SRIP)

The Simsbury Reading Intervention Program (SRIP) is designed to serve both regular and special education students (K-6) who qualify for Tier II reading interventions. Reading teachers address students’ specific weaknesses, as identified via school-wide screenings, in the five core areas of literacy (Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Comprehension Strategies, Fluency, and Vocabulary). The intervention is provided during 30-minute sessions to small groups of students, in addition to the Tier I instruction that students receive in the classroom. Students who do not respond to the targeted instruction at Tier II will be referred to the building-based Student Intervention Team (SIT).


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What is SRIP?

What is SRIP?

SRIP is based on best practices:

  • Clear and rigorous grade-level expectations for reading proficiency
  • Balanced instruction in the five areas of literacy
  • Explicit instruction in phonics in the early grades and reading comprehension in the later grades
  • Frequent measurement of student achievement and growth
  • Serves K-6 students who qualify for reading intervention
  • Immediate and intensive additional instruction for struggling readers, averaging 30 minutes a day and using more than one strategy.
  • Remediation and intervention that are seamlessly connected to each day’s full class instruction
  • Certified teachers highly trained in reading instruction

How SRIP instruction is delivered:

  • 3 intervention cycles (progress reports are sent home with classroom report cards)
  • 30 minute instructional lessons based upon student needs and may address any of the following critical components of reading: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Comprehension Strategies, Fluency, and Vocabulary
  • 5 days per week for K-3 students
  • up to 4 days per week for students in grades 4-6

How do teachers collaborate and communicate in SRIP?

The SRIP program involves a high level of collaboration between SRIP teachers, classroom teachers, and ESS case managers.

Across all grades, teachers use data to monitor student performance, adjust learning goals, and exit students from the intervention.

How do students enter and exit SRIP?

  • Students qualify based upon performance on universal screenings and/or district reading assessments
  • Specific criteria for intervention is pre-determined for each grade level
  • Student performance is monitored continually for growth and progress
  • Ongoing assessments provide data to identify students who need further intervention
  • Learning goals are adjusted as needed
  • Students who do not respond to targeted instruction at Tier II are referred to the building-based Student Intervention Team (SIT)
  • Students are approved to exit the program

What does SRIP look like in Kindergarten?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

In the beginning of the school year, reading teachers provide additional early literacy support. As the year progresses, literacy intervention will include small group instruction five days per week for up to 30 minutes. Lessons are designed to support skills in a fun and engaging way!

A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, phonics, oral language, and comprehension. The focus of instruction begins with the teaching of letters and their sounds and phonological awareness skills. Later in the year students are developing their sight word vocabulary, applying reading strategies to read early level books. They engage in literal and inferential questioning when comprehending books that are read aloud.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 1?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered five days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and written comprehension. In first grade intervention, there is an emphasis on more comprehensive word study (phonics), retelling, and making predictions.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 2?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered five days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: phonics , reading fluency, vocabulary, and oral or written comprehension. In second grade, intervention would include continuation of word study (phonics), moving toward the ability to read multi-syllabic words. Comprehension skills expand to include summarization in oral and written form, determining main idea as well as developing inferential thinking, interpreting and reflecting during and after reading.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 3?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered five days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: fluency, vocabulary, applying phonics skills to read larger words, and oral or written comprehension. In third grade intervention, careful close reading is emphasized, with students determining what the author has to say, what the author’s purpose was, what the words mean, and what the structure of the text tells them.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 4?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered up to four days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: vocabulary, close reading, reading fluency , and oral or written comprehension . In fourth grade, intervention continues to emphasize careful close reading with text across genres that are of greater length and complexity. During vocabulary instruction, morphology (meaningful word parts) is a significant focus.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 5?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered up to four days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: vocabulary, close reading, reading fluency , and oral or written comprehension. In fifth grade, intervention continues to emphasize careful close reading with text across genres that are of greater length and complexity. During vocabulary instruction, morphology (meaningful word parts) continues as a significant focus. Note taking skills are introduced as a means of monitoring comprehension.

What does SRIP look like in Grade 6?

SRIP is a regular education reading intervention program offered to students who did not meet set criteria on district reading assessments. Instruction is designed to support skills being introduced in the classroom.

Intervention consists of small group instruction delivered up to four days a week for 30 minutes. A typical lesson addresses the following core literacy components: vocabulary, close reading, reading fluency , and oral or written comprehension. In sixth grade, intervention continues to emphasize careful close reading with text across genres that are of greater length and complexity. Integration of all previously taught skills is encouraged to promote independence.

SRIP Faculty

Sharon Cabell

Squadron Line Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Amy Cournoyer

Reading Intervention Teacher
Tootin' Hills Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Wendy Darasz

Latimer Lane Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Jennifer Fritz

SRIP
Squadron Line Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Lisa Hart

Tootin' Hills Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Kathy Larkum

Squadron Line Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Jean Lewanda

Tariffville Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Helen Tabaka

Central Elementary School
Reading, SRIP

Jennifer Yagid

Reading Intervention Teacher
Latimer Lane Elementary School, Tariffville Elementary School
Reading, SRIP
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